Tag: psychology

How illnesses become psychologised: Long COVID, ME, and the ‘All-In-Your-Head’ cartel

I was delighted to be part of this panel discussion on Gez Medinger‘s YouTube channel, RUN-DMC. As many readers will know, Gez is a London-based film producer and director who has been debilitated with severe Long COVID ever since contracting Covid early in the pandemic. His YouTube channel is now […]

Post-Trump Stress Disorder

Well, that escalated quickly. Or rather, slowly. Because when democracies start to fray, the corrosion is usually incremental: few regimes are overthrown overnight. The first few inflammatory statements are dismissed as innocuous, even as idiotic. But gradually, norms are shifted, tribes moulded, and scapegoats identified. Out-group hostility is the fulcrum […]

Psychology’s exaggeration crisis

From the Archives [A while back, I wrote this piece about academic exaggeration for The Psychologist magazine. See what you make of it…] Not another article about the crisis in psychology, you might complain. Déjà vu all over again? You thought we reached peak crisis some time ago, didn’t you? […]

person covered with gray blanket

No More Mr NICE Guy…

The newly released draft NICE guidelines for the management of “myalgic encephalomyelitis (or encephalopathy)/chronic fatigue syndrome” continue to cause a stir. And rightly so. The new guidelines not only repudiate a heretofore favoured treatment approach for a particular illness, they also threaten to discredit an entire (albeit quirky) branch of […]

You’re so vain, you probably think this global pandemic is about you

[A version of this article appeared in the Irish Examiner on 22 October 2020 ] The challenges of COVID-19 have been well reported. Death, disease, and debilitation are the scariest. Discombobulation also makes the list — nobody likes it when the entire world (more or less) gets turned upside-down. And […]